1987

The new year of 3rd January 1987 saw a White Noise gig with Skrewdriver, south London’s No Remorse playing their first gig, Croydon’s own Sudden Impact and a band from Germany called Boots & Braces. It was around now that the NF was politically trying something new towards what it called a Third Way. Race was no longer the central issue and this was to be the undoing of the National Front. Ian was not happy with the way things were going. White Noise was bringing in more recruits, but the funds of this were being used for the NF efforts and not reinvested back into White Noise as promised. Skrewdriver’s record sales royalties became an issue. The NF blamed Rock-o-Rama, who in turn blamed the NF. So Ian decided enough was enough and forwarded a resignation letter. The NF leadership realised that they may have gone a step too far. Ian would have his royalties paid directly from Germany and the National Front would pledge more funds for White Noise. Ian believed what he was told and retracted his resignation and returned to work for the NF. But it didn’t last long as again Ian and the NF leadership were soon arguing. Ian had always been prepared to withstand the criticism he got from them. They would often pick at his writings, spelling and grammar errors etc. Ian’s distrust of Patrick Harrington and Derek Holland would inevitably mean that he would have to leave the NF and White Noise. Simultaneously the NF leadership, in an attempt to gain more political respectability with the British public tried to water down Skrewdriver’s National Socialist image by censoring lan’s lyrics and telling him what to sing about. The White Noise management of Patrick Harrington, Nick Griffin and Derek Holland dictated that there was to be no hail victory’s and no derogatory references to blacks. Soon after this the NF split itself into two. After which it gradually emerged that the White Noise Club had not been paying royalties due to the bands, had been ripping off band supporters ordering records through their mail order service and that Rock-o-Rama in Germany was owed around £3,000 for merchandise obtained via the WNC. Quite rightly Herbert chairman of Rock-o-Rama records, refused to release any new material by the WNC bands or supply any further records to the NF until the debt was paid in full. By the summer totally disgusted with the way Harrington, Griffin and Holland had gone about things with their gross dishonesty, lan once again handed in his letter of resignation to White Noise magazine and the National Front, with most of the other White rock bands following him. Ian never joined another political party again. 1987 was also Skrewdriver’s 10th year anniversary. Ian thought it was a good idea to make a book. Produced independently it was a fairly subdued affair. The book’s author Joe Pearce, spent a night at Ian’s bedsit where they worked though the night getting the Skrewdriver story on tape. The NF soon were writing to Skullhead’s Kev Turner who was in prison at the time. They wanted to make sure he remained loyal to the White Noise. They also wrote to Ken McClellan of Brutal Attack who had been working in the NF head office in Croydon. They told Ken that Skrewdriver had definitely had their day and that with the help of White Noise, Brutal Attack would become bigger than Skrewdriver would ever be. A dirty tricks campaign was well under way. Ian’s sick mother even received menacing phone calls. Ian’s decision to leave had cut them deep.

By early summer Ian decided that something new was required that would represent the music scene and the bands. An exclusive organisation free from constraints and control of any political party. RAC and band supporters came from many different political groups on the far-right. An independent organisation would be for unity. As a direct result of the widely felt disappointment with the incompetent leaders of White Noise, lan launched a new independent organisation that would be run by the people that it would serve. The organisation was given the name Blood & Honour and within a year nearly all the Nationalist bands and their supporters had joined the association. Leaving Harrington and his cronies with only a handful of members and just a few bands to cash in on. Blood & Honour was an instant success and only after a few months few months had become a very stable organisation. Circulation of Blood & Honour magazine was massive and there was a huge increase in the number of gigs being organised.

 

The B&H Founding Statement

 

BLOOD & HONOUR IS:

An independent National Socialist movement supporting all active NS / Nationalist parties and groups in the White world.

A magazine promoting NS ideals, NS music, be it rock. Oi!, metal, etc.

A cog in a movement that has divisions in most countries. A no compromising stand against all we consider corrupt.

 

OUR AIMS:

To unite White youth.

To promote White Power through positive ideals and a positive message.

To create units in every city hi every town in every country. To promote our culture and our traditions.

To help any worthy political organisation either financially or with manpower on the streets.

To win our nations back, once and for all.

 

Ian Stuart’s Blood and Honour was named after the motto of the Hitler Youth. Which was proudly engraved on their knives, it was also the title of Skrewdriver’s latest vinyl album. The organisation was self-titled as the ‘Independent Voice of Rock Against Communism’. The first issue of the magazine of the same name featured an interview with Ian who used the opportunity to explain the current situation of the RAC scene. Skrewdriver played their first independent concert on the June 4th 1987. Skrewdriver was greeted on stage by hundreds shouting Sieg Heil. Decorating the walls behind the bands were Union Jacks, Sun wheel or Celtic Cross banners made by Skrewdriver and Brutal Attack guitarist Martin Cross. Skrewdriver’s back-drop banner had been commissioned on Ian’s return to the scene in 1982 as was designed and made by leading members of the Essex British Movement. On stage, Ian was back to delivering mini-speeches In-between songs then storming straight into his song. The subject of his speeches ranged from a general attack on government’s immigration policy or a current news item that he could turn to his advantage. Popular hates included the CND, Garry Bushell, Ken Livingstone, Nelson Mandela and almost anyone left wing. Ian influence over the crowd was immense.

 

Nevertheless the White Noise Club struggled on and started to pursue a strange path towards what they called National Revolution. Developments had been taking place within the NF for some time now with a few representatives looking to pre-Hitlerite national revolutionary and Strasserite ideas as a way of taking the movement forward. Michael Walker’s magazine Scorpion provided a forum for these discussions. Earlier in the 1980’s in the USA a group of white men had enough of talking and no action and decided to take the war to ZOG themselves. Robert Mathews formed a group with fellow White men called The Order. They went on a robbing spree against ZOG accumulating a few dead bodies and a war chest of over $7 million counterfeit dollars. Whilst in Europe a wave of extreme-right bombings in Italy occurred. These the bombings killed over 100 lives were carried out by the Armed Revolutionary Nuclei (NAR), a cell structured organisation that advocated a style of fascist politics known as the Third Position. These terrorist activities proved inspirational to some in the NF. Italians wanted for questioning about a series of killings and bank robberies were provided with safe housing in Britain with the help of the League of St. George. Led by Roberto Fiore, the Italians made contact with Nick Griffin, Derek Holland and Joe Pearce. Fiore, Holland and others worked jointly on a magazine called Rising which put across this new thinking, and Holland went on to produce a booklet, The Political Soldier, which became their guiding publication. This political soldier element within the NF made drastic changes to its polices, dropping public racism and replacing it with support for black nationalists such as Louis Farrakhan. Griffin and Holland even travelled to Libya which resulted in Colonel Gadaffi becoming an unlikely hero and the NF News appearing with a black power fist on the cover with the words Fight Racism! For many supporters it was very hard to see what they had fought for destroyed from within. There was even stories that the NF leaders were perverts of a homosexual nature.

 

The new Blood & Honour scene soon called the new NF of Harrington, Holland and Griffin the Nutty Fairy Party and the internal strife continued for a few more months before dying. They only managed to stay afloat as long as they did because the Newcastle based Odinist white rock band Skullhead refused to believe that it was a corrupt and dying organisation. Skullhead formed in 1984 and built up a strong following in the North. The bands’ vocalist Kev Turner was in HMP Arlington at the time of the NF troubles and on his release continued to remain loyal to the White Noise Club. In fact, much to the infuriation of the Consett MP at the time and the Searchlight anti-fascist magazine, published by Jewish communist Gerry Gable, Kev even managed to gig with Skullhead whilst out on weekend leave. The NF’s Patrick Harrington visited Bruhl in Germany to remove any rumours of corruption and allegations of foul play. He visited Rock-o-Rama records and gave Herbert his long over due debt of £3,000. Once the bill was paid Harrington then had the balls ask if it was okay to take home more records on credit. He was obviously told where to go. Harrington also asked for a letter from Herbert stating that he had paid the £3,000 debt, so he could deny having ever ripped people off. Herbert agreed to writing the letter but wanted to also include a note about the eleven month delay in that payment. In one final attempt to gain credibility, the White Noise Club was closed down and reinvented as a new organisation called Counter Culture. This was a real mix of music with Skullhead and Cardiff’s Violent Storm alongside opera and classical music. The nationalist bands were then told they needed to smarten up their image and were told to give up their boots and white power t-shirts. This was the last straw for Skullhead and the band quit the National Front and its Counter Culture. The band then formed their own association named Unity Productions. This was like Blood & Honour in it operated independently and aligned itself to no specific political organisation. It wasn’t before long the two groups were co-operating together and holding joint Unity / Blood & Honour gigs. Disillusion members of the NF who left soon after the party went about it’s reinventing as a Third Way organisation and around the same time Ian had resigned from the NF for a second time carried on the original NF ideals through what was called the NF Flag group. They had continued to be active on the streets and by the new year of 1990 were led by lan Anderson. The Flag Group were soon able to claim the National Front name as their own. All the trouble with the White Noise Club could have been easily sorted if the scene leaders had the bottle to unite in common and talk to each other positively. This was never to happen and ended up with rumours and counter-rumours working the mill non-stop.

 

Ian was still dealing with the NF who were still trying all kinds of tactics to destroy his latest project. The editorial in B & H magazine was taken up with anti-NF ranting. The subject of Harrington and Holland also became apparent in Ian’s lyrics. One song The New Boss, drew its inspiration from The Who’s “Won’t get fooled again”, a song the band covered in the 1970’s. Although he devoted much time to anti-Harrington-Holland NF it must be said they spent twice as much time being bothered about him. The NF instructed its membership that it was a party offence to read the Blood & Honour magazine. Ian had much fun ridiculing some of the White Noise fans who slagged Blood and Honour but still wanted to read it’s magazine. Later Harrington claimed that they were purging their ranks of Nazis. They even contacted the Board of Deputies of British Jews informing them that membership was now open to Jews. Ian was soon finding that Skrewdriver was even in greater demand. More record stores were stocking his Rock-o-Rama releases and offers of gigs were coming in from all across Europe.

 

Skrewdriver returned to Europe by playing in Gothenburg, Sweden. The ferry trip took over 24 hours and the band used the time to get totally merry. On arrival in Sweden they were met by members of band Dirlewanger. Hospitality was excellent and although there were a few hitches at the gig the whole weekend was a great success. This trip was later written as the song Land of Ice. With the ever-growing European interest arrangements were soon made for a Blood & Honour gig to be held in Scandinavia. Earlier in the mid-1980’s Sweden nationalist had gain some popularity, so now was a perfect time to spread the word of B & H. With skinheads first appearing in Stockholm back in 1979 and used to meet in a rock club called the Underground. This was later closed down and a new place was adopted near the subway station in Gamla Stan the Shopter Plate. So 29th November 1987 after a lot of organising and hard work, Skrewdriver finally got to Stockholm. First the PA didn’t turn up then the original venue was cancelled. The police tried their best to give the organisers a hard time, however against all the pressure an extremely small PA was acquired and the gig went ahead regardless. As a direct result of the concert, Blood & Honour established new divisions in Stockholm and Gothenburg. Travelling supporters from Finland, Denmark, Germany, and Holland saw Blood & Honour bands Dirlewanger, Vit Aggression, Agent Bulldog and Skrewdriver. Supporters eagerly bought copies of Blood & Honour Issue 2 and returned home carrying the message of B & H of independent unity. Ian was busy as ever with British nationalism, touring the country and Europe with Skrewdriver, writing for and replying to zines and recording albums. By now lan had his far share of female admirers but as yet that special person had not entered his life. Whilst in Gothenburg Ian met a girl by the name of Agnetta and the two of them started a relationship. At first many comrades thought lan and Agnetta’s fling was just a bit of fun but it quickly moved into a more serious relationship. With people speculating Ian might even move to live in Sweden. After a brief, but passionate relationship it came to an abrupt end.

 

Rock-o-Rama was given the go-ahead to produce the new Skrewdriver LP White Rider. The level of musical talent and skill was totally unique to what had gone before. Ian’s songs were lyrically masterpieces and more professional than ever before. It included many of the songs lan wrote whilst in prison. Where Has Justice Gone and Behind The Bars was lan’s attack on the corrupt legal system. The LP was well produced, a mixture of gritty rock anthems including lan’s favourite Skrewdriver track I Can See The Fire, and the ballad about the Waffen-SS and their plight on the eastern front – The Snow Fell. The song Strike Force had the line “Watch Out Nigger!” edited out before its release. It was a call to support the White nationalists in South Africa. The cover design for the LP was drawn by Christian from Germany. Which once again showed the growing global influence the band was having on the World. On the back of the album cover the band thanked people from America, Australia, Austria, Bavaria, Belgium, Denmark, England, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Holland, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Rhodesia, Scotland, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, Ulster and Wales! 1987 also saw the release of two Skrewdriver mini LP’s. The Voice Of Britain was out on White Power Records and Boots & Braces by Rock-o-Rama. These LP’s were just a collection of singles. Skrewdriver singles were now much sort after items and these albums were seen as a way of getting them out to the public.

Another gig was arranged for the 5th September 1987. In the southern area of Morden, Surrey seeing Skrewdriver, Brutal Attack, Sudden Impact and newcomers No Remorse in front of a 500 strong crowd. Which included French, Italian and German supporters. Skrewdriver’s line-up had changed again and now consisted of lan Stuart on vocals, Merv Shields on bass, Martin Cross on guitar, and John Burnley on drums. John was brother of Paul Burnley from No Remorse. At the same gig Skrewdriver decided to do a guest spot of five numbers and were filmed for Belgium Television.